Archive for the ‘Germany’ category

What’s on ?

April 23, 2008

eDonkey has been on the receiving end of much music industry legal action in recent months. Last September a number of German eDonkey servers were taken offline after a court issued an injunction against them. User numbers halved – temporarily. In January this year the Dutch anti-piracy outfit BREIN won judgement against an eDonkey hashlinksite, Shareconnector.

Would the file-sharing community miss a lot if eDonkey went down? Well some recent research from iPoque gives interesting indications of what people use eDonkey (and Bit Torrent) for.

Across the regions looked at – Germany, Southern Europe and Middle East – patterns of usage vary. the most popuilar BT and eDonkey music downloads are in the form of discographies (i.e. more than one album at once). In ME and Southern Europe over half of the top 75 audio was discogs. Neither the top BT audio nor the top eDonkey audio downloads closely reflected the charts and in Southern Europe much of the top downloads appeared to be local language.

BT video downloads are primarly movies, with some pornography featuring in the Top 75 for Germany. On eDonkey on ther other hand every region is sharing porn. A cursory look at the titles and one can make the generalisations that Southern Europeans like anal, Germans like lesbians and the odd animal, and the Middle East has more specialist and suspect interests like shemales and children.

When it comes to eBooks English is the prevalant language with Sat Nav data being particularly in demand in Southern Europe.

Mp3newswire reports on a new Digital Music News research report which shows continued rapid growth in use of Bit torrent and increased consolidation in P2P client apps so maybe eDonkey will get killed by IFPI/MPAA anyway and users migrate. 

 

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Rants about copyright laws come before fact-checking

September 24, 2007

Variety reported that the German government had made it illegal to copy CDs, even for personal use. The story was then picked up by BoingBoing which, fortunately, allows comments on its posts thereby enabling users who had read up some of the German reportage (e.g.) to reveal inaccuracies in Variety’s article.

From the users comments it becomes clear that:

  • ‘the law still allows people to make copies of CDs and DVDs for personal use as long as those media do not have any protection mechanism on them. what makes this illegal is the cracking of a protection mechanism.’
  • ‘the part of the new copyright law which says that breaking copy protection or encryption is illegal is actually not new, this was already the case before.’
  • ‘The private copy becomes illegal if it’s made from an illegal source.’
  • The levies system is being slightly updated.

 Now the Variety article sits on the internet hopelessly inaccurate and out of date whilst the BoingBoing article is an example how to use your readership to your advantage. Hell, I well know that Boing Boing is dead against anything copyright owners do to stick up for their IP but at least it is happy to stand corrected when it runs away with itself.